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Atlantic Travel Bubble

When did the Atlantic bubble start?

It started at 12:01 a.m. on July 3. On. Nov. 23, the Atlantic provinces are advising caution relating to non-essential travel within bubble. https://novascotia.ca/news/release/?id=20201123003


What is essential travel within the Atlantic bubble?

We consider travel to be necessary in the following situations: • people who must travel for work that cannot be done virtually • legal custody arrangements that require parents or children to travel for visits • essential, specialized health care treatment that is not available in Nova Scotia • participating in an essential legal proceeding outside Nova Scotia when virtual attendance is not possible • students studying outside of Nova Scotia who’s primary or family residence is in Nova Scotia • visiting an immediate family member who is nearing end of life • attending a funeral or service (like a burial or celebration of life) for an immediate family member


What is non-essential travel within the Atlantic bubble?

Some examples of travel that is not necessary are vacations, visits, business matters that could be done virtually or by someone else outside the bubble, picking up or dropping off non-essential items, and so on.


Newfoundland and Labrador and PEI have announced that they are pulling out of the Atlantic bubble for two weeks. Does that mean that someone coming from PEI or NFLD entering NS has to self-isolate for 14 days?

People entering Nova Scotia from other Atlantic Provinces are not required to self-isolate however we are advising against non-essential travel within the Atlantic bubble.


I am in NFLD/PEI for non-essential reasons right now. Do I need to self-isolate?

Each province continues to have its own public health measures in place. Anyone planning to travel in another province should make sure they understand the requirements there before they go.


If I go NFLD/PEI for non-essential reasons and need to self-isolate for 14 days, what happens if I need to leave before the 14-day self-isolation period? Will I have to complete my self-isolation in Nova Scotia?

People entering Nova Scotia from other Atlantic Provinces are not required to self-isolate however we are advising against non-essential travel within the Atlantic bubble.


How are you going to enforce this to ensure people coming to Nova Scotia are only coming in for essential purposes?

We believe people understand the importance of these measures. As our case numbers climb, it’s important for all of us to follow public health guidelines and keep each other safe.


Will people entering Nova Scotia from another Atlantic Province be required to fill out the NS Safe Check-in Form?

Any adult who enters Nova Scotia from outside Atlantic Canada is required to complete the Nova Scotia Safe Check-in, unless they are exempt from the self-isolation requirement or have already completed their 14-day self-isolation in another Atlantic province.


Can you drive from Labrador (ie through Quebec) and into New Brunswick and Nova Scotia and still be considered to be traveling inside the Atlantic bubble?

Yes, as long as your drive directly through Quebec as possible with as few stops as possible. In effect, you are staying in the Atlantic bubble by mainly staying in your vehicle while you drive through Quebec, however, we are advising against non-essential travel within the Atlantic bubble.


Are visitors from outside Atlantic Canada (ie, other parts of Canada, other countries) allowed to visit Nova Scotia?

Visitors from outside Atlantic Canada can come into Nova Scotia but must self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival, unless they have already done so in another Atlantic province. They must complete the Nova Scotia Safe Check-in.


What kind of identification or proof of residency will be required for Atlantic Canadians who want to come into Nova Scotia? Is there a self-declaration form?

To enter Nova Scotia without self-isolating, every adult needs to show either a drivers’ license, government identification card, health card, or a utility bill or bank statement with a valid Atlantic Canadian permanent home address to provincial officials at airports, ferries or the land border when they arrive in the province. No self-declaration form is required.


Do children need proof of residency?

Children under the age of 18 who are accompanied by a parent do not require proof of permanent residency in Atlantic Canada in order to come into Nova Scotia without self isolating. Their parent(s) must have this proof.

Children under the age of 18 who enter Nova Scotia without a parent must have proof of permanent residency in Atlantic Canada in order to not self isolate for 14 days upon arrival.


Where do we find the rules in each province? How do we know what’s open, what’s closed?

Each province has a dedicated coronavirus website with information about their rules: Nova Scotia: https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/ Prince Edward Island: https://www.princeedwardisland.ca/en/information/health-andwellness/atlantic-provinces-travel-bubble New Brunswick: http://www.gnb.ca/coronavirus Newfoundland and Labrador: https://www.gov.nl.ca/covid-19/


Are all the Atlantic provinces now following the same rules? Or does each province keep using its own set of rules?

Each province continues to have its own public health measures in place. Anyone planning to travel in another province should make sure they understand the requirements there before they go.


Will all points of entry continue to be staffed by enforcement personnel? Are they screening people?

We will continue to have a presence at all entrances to the province – airports, ferries, and the land border with New Brunswick. Officials will check identification to confirm residency in Atlantic Canada.

People from outside Atlantic Canada will be informed that they must self isolate for 14 days upon arrival in Nova Scotia. Travelers should expect delays.


Will truck drivers and other workers get priority or will they have to wait like any other visitor?

Yes, we have a chit system in place so that they will continue to pass through without stopping for questions.


Will there be more testing?

We continue to advise anyone who has one or more of the symptoms of COVID-19 to get tested. If you have symptoms, you should not travel.


*Information provided by Emergency Management Office of Nova Scotia.




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